© 2019 SARA AZARI

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At the Law Office of Sara Azari in Los Angeles, you will find a criminal defense attorney who is committed to protecting the rights of and aggressively pursuing justice for her clients. Sara Azari has successfully represented clients in a range of criminal cases in both state and federal courts.

 

333 S. Hope Street, 40th Floor

Los Angeles, CA 90071

FRAUD / WHITE COLLAR CRIMES

Professionals being charged with a white collar offense are not only exposed to significant fines and jail time, but if convicted, are likely to suffer permanent damage to their career and reputation.

 

Ms. Azari appreciates the severity of such accusations and the collateral consequences and penalties associated with them. At the Law Office of Sara Azari, we pay close attention to every detail, leaving no stone unturned. We frequently enlist skilled investigators such as former IRS and FBI agents, postal investigators, government agents, and prosecutors as experts in the defense of our white collar matters.

 

A successful criminal defense strategy when defending white collar accusations often requires finding a needle in a haystack. We have a strong record of finding the smallest needle in the largest haystack. As a result, Ms. Azari is recognized as a very reputable attorney with a long and consistent record of success in this area.

 

We defend our clients against all white collar accusations. A list of some examples can be found on the left sidebar

Some examples of white collar fraud include:

 

Commercial Fraud

Businesses that intentionally or unintentionally misrepresent their profits and expenses may be accused of commercial fraud. However, many businesses are often falsely accused of commercial fraud with insufficient evidence to support the charge. To be proven guilty of commercial fraud, the court must find that:

 

  • The defendant made a false statement of material fact

  • The defendant knew that the statement was untrue

  • The defendant intended to deceive the victim

  • The victim justifiably relied on the statement

  • The victim was injured as a result

 

Computer Fraud

A common example of computer fraud is where an individual hacks into the emails or accounts of another without consent or authorization and by doing so, obtains or uses personal or financial information towards engaging in an unlawful activity such as transferring funds to their own financial accounts.

 

Credit Card Fraud

Individuals may be accused of credit card fraud in the following common circumstances:

  • Creating a fake but valid credit card

  • Unauthorized use of another’s credit card information for the purchase of goods and services

 

Criminal Tax Fraud

The term "criminal tax fraud," or "tax evasion," refers to the avoidance of paying federal, state, or local taxes by illegal means. This should not be confused with tax avoidance (attempts to reduce or avoid tax payment through legal means) or tax resistance (the declared refusal to pay taxes for conscientious or ethical reasons). In general, mere mistakes and carelessness are not considered tax fraud. When determining whether criminal tax fraud has been committed, the IRS will look for acts of intentional wrongdoing, which may include:

 

  • Failing to file a tax return

  • Understating income

  • Providing inadequate records

  • Concealing assets

  • Unwillingness to cooperate with tax authorities

  • Engaging in and/or attempting to conceal illegal activities

 

Healthcare & Insurance Fraud

While there is no finite list of conduct that can result in a charge of healthcare fraud, some of the conduct that frequently results in criminal charges include:

 

  • Up-coding insurance claims

  • Ghost patients

  • Services not provided

  • Services not medically necessary

  • Fraudulent prescribing of compound medication

  • Receipt of kick-back payments

  • Worthless services

  • "Incident to" violations

  • Unqualified or unlicensed providers

  • Unlawful prescribing of pharmaceuticals and/or steroids

  • Black market pharmaceutical sales (illicit sales of pharmaceuticals)

  • Fraudulent claims to recover insurance or worker’s compensation benefits

  • Medicare/Medi-Cal fraud

 

Immigration Fraud

Allegations of immigration fraud commonly involve falsifying a visa or citizenship application or fraudulently obtaining legal status such as by way of a sham marriage or employment. There are two types of immigration fraud:

 

Document Fraud: occurs when entry/admission into the United States is procured by fraud or by willfully misrepresenting a material fact. Examples of document immigration fraud relating to document misrepresentation include:

 

  • use of a false name, birth date or marital status to obtain a visa, an extension or change of status or adjustment of status; and

  • making a false claim to be a U.S. citizen or permanent resident on an I-9 form in order to obtain employment.

 

Benefit Application Fraud occurs when an individual unlawfully obtains a benefit under the immigration laws.

 

Loan Fraud

Also known as "mortgage fraud", some examples of this type of accusation include:

 

  • Home buyers inflating their income information on a loan;

  • Real estate developers providing deceptive information to banks to qualify buyers;

  • Mortgage brokers providing false information to financial institutions in order to get a more attractive loan for their clients; and

  • Real estate agents paying the down payment on a property without informing the financial institution issuing a loan.

 

Mail Fraud

Any unlawful conduct that requires the use of the postal system or couriers such as Federal Express, DHL, and UPS may result in accusations of mail fraud. There are numerous examples of mail fraud, including:

  • Theft of mail from a mailbox

  • Non-delivery or misrepresentation of mail-order merchandise

  • Internet and online auction fraud

  • Impersonation of an individual to receive mail

  • Falsification of promotional checks

  • Sending solicitations in the semblance of invoices

  • Fraudulent get-rich-quick and work-at-home schemes

  • Setting up counterfeit charities

 

Medical Fraud

While there is no finite list of conduct that can result in a charge of medical fraud, some of the conduct that frequently results in criminal charges include:

 

  • Up-coding insurance claims

  • Ghost patients

  • Services not provided

  • Services not medically necessary

  • Fraudulent prescribing of compound medication

  • Receipt of kick-back payments

  • Worthless services

  • "Incident to" violations

  • Unqualified or unlicensed providers

  • Unlawful prescribing of pharmaceuticals and/or steroids

  • Black market pharmaceutical sales (illicit sales of pharmaceuticals)

  • Fraudulent claims to recover insurance or worker’s compensation benefits

  • Medicare/Medi-Cal fraud

 

Real Estate Fraud

The two most prevalent charges of real estate fraud are mortgage fraud and title fraud. 

 

  • Mortgage fraud is the use of false information to secure a mortgage loan that the individual is unable to obtain otherwise. 

 

  • Title fraud is the unauthorized assumption of a homeowner's identity in order to claim the title of a home towards the sale of the property or for financial gain against the property as collateral. 

 

Securities Fraud

Securities fraud, also known as investment fraud, is a white-collar crime that involves the deception or manipulation of investors in order to commit theft. It also involves misleading accounting firms by “fixing” a company’s books. An individual or business may commit securities fraud by intentionally misrepresenting the financial well-being of a company and other activities including:

 

  • Understating revenues

  • Overstating assets

  • Making unethical or unauthorized trades

  • Creating illegal accounts

  • Engaging in insider trading

 

Wire Fraud

Wire fraud is committed by using a mode of communication - the Internet, radio, television, phone, fax machine, or any other communication medium other than mail – to obtain money, property, or sensitive personal information fraudulently.

Some common examples of wire fraud accusations include:

 

  • Sending legitimate-looking emails with the intent to obtain private personal information, known as email phishing

  • Legitimate-looking websites that are designed to trick users into submitting personal information

  • Talking an individual into providing identifying or financial information over the phone.

  • Use of emails to obtain illegal kickbacks

  • Use of emails to obtain a loan or any funding based on false information.